Image Uploading Problems

The following support instructions involve the use of an FTP program. If you're not sure what an FTP program is, or how to use it, visit this tutorial before proceeding.

Sometimes, especially with new WordPress installations, there can be problems uploading images into posts and pages.  There are various reasons why this might happen.  This tutorial starts by proposing a number of fixes, from the most common solutions to the most rare. Often you’ll get an error message of some kind but not always.

your error might say something different - these are just examples

your error might say something different – these are just examples

Following the below steps will correct almost all image uploading problems – click the blue “next section” button below to for more options:

Step 1: Test with plugins disabled

The first step in troubleshooting any WordPress error is to deactivate all of your plugins (by going to “Plugins” in your WordPress admin area) to see if that resolves the problem.

deactivate all pluginsIf it does, turn them back on one by one (testing each time) to see which one was the culprit.reactivate pluginsThen, if you can live without that one, do so.  Or you could try using a different plugin that offers similar functionality.

If this did not help, click the blue “next section” button below to continue:

Step 2: Try a different browser

From time to time it happens that a particular browser version has trouble uploading images to WordPress. Safari, in particular has been known for this. So, try uploading images to a post/page using a different browser. It’s a good idea to disable your extensions as well, so as to eliminate that variable.

If this did not help, click the blue “next section” button below to continue:

Step 3: Check your file type

WordPress will only accept .jpg, .gif or .png file types when uploading an image, so check to make sure that the file you’re trying to upload is one of these three file types.  If not, you will most likely get an error message, like so:

Attempting to upload an Adobe Illustrator image file

Attempting to upload an Adobe Illustrator image file

Attempting to upload a TIFF image file

Attempting to upload a TIFF image file

Go back and re-save your image as one of the acceptable file types and try uploading again.

 

If this did not help, click the blue “next section” button below to continue:

Step 4: Test with a default WordPress theme

It’s now time to determine if the problem is specifically related to the ProPhoto theme, or if it is a universal problem affecting all theme types.

With your plugins still disabled, go to “Appearance” > “Themes”. Click “activate” under one of the default WordPress themes like “Twenty Fourteen” or “Twenty Fifteen.”wp42 activate default theme1Don’t worry, you can switch back to ProPhoto with no negative repercussions. If there is not a WordPress theme in the “Available Themes” area you can easily upload one by clicking “Add New” and searching for “Twenty Fifteen” in the search box. See below.

wp42 install default theme1

Search for and install a default WordPress theme

wp42 activate default theme 2

Activate the new theme

With a default theme active, try to upload images to a post/page.

If it works, then it’s time to contact us. That means the problem is, at least in part, related to ProPhoto. To reactivate ProPhoto, click “activate” under the ProPhoto theme.

Reactivate ProPhoto

Reactivate ProPhoto

If this did not help, click the blue “next section” button below to continue:

Step 5: Check your storage space with your host

If this did not help, click the blue “next section” button below to continue:

Step 6: Contact your host

There are a few other things you can try that we covered later in this tutorial. But if you have reached this point and and still are having trouble uploading images to posts and pages, the issue is almost always with your host and the configuration of your server. A server configuration problem can manifest in different ways. You might not be able to upload any images or your problem might be that you can’t upload a certain number of images at once. We have seen servers that allow only 3 images at a time and some that only allow 45 at a time. Other hosts will block your IP address temporarily if you attempt to upload what they deem to be too many images. These are problems you must talk to your host about. You should be able to upload at least 100 images at a time.

The kneejerk response of almost all host tech support folks is to blame the theme or a plugin. However, if you have followed all the steps thus far, you know that is not the case. You might have to press fairly hard to get them to take you seriously. If the first tech support person blows you off, don’t be afraid to call back and try to get in touch with someone more helpful. We do this all the time :). When you can’t do something as basic as upload images to a WordPress site, that is a problem that your host should address immediately. Stress that a full 20% of the internet runs on WordPress right now. Below are some ideas for helping to frame your discussion with your host.

  • State your problem – “I can’t upload images.” or “I can only upload (x) images at one time”
  • Describe any error message you are receiving.
  • Explain that you have replicated the problem running a default WordPress theme with no plugins running.
  • Explain that what you want to do is very common and that if you cannot you’ll have to change hosts. Many other people will as well if they don’t change how they set up their servers.
  • Try to have them replicate the problem on your site while talking to you on the phone.
  • Suggest that there may be a server security setting or module that needs to be less restrictive.
  • Call back and repeat.

Click the blue “next section” button below for some more rare fixes.

Step 7: Check your upload path (rare)

To check your upload path, in your WordPress admin area, go to “Settings” > “Media”.

wp42 settings mediaIf your uploads path is set up correctly so that images are uploaded to “wp-content/uploads“, you won’t see the option to edit the pathway.  You will only see a box to check to organize your uploads into dated folders (which you should check).

wp42 uploads path correctIf you see something different, then that means the uploads path has been set up in a way that could potentially cause uploading problems.wp42 uploads pathProPhoto works best when the default uploads path is maintained.  So if you see this pathway, first record what it is (so you can change back if you need to) and change the first box to “wp-content/uploads.”  Leave the second box blank.  If that fixes your problems, great!  If not, you’ll want to contact your host and ask for their help.  You might want to contact us as well.

What if I want to define a different uploads path?

You can define a different uploads directory via your wp-config.php file as show at http://codex.wordpress.org/Editing_wp-config.php#Moving_uploads_folder.

If this did not help, click the blue “next section” button below to continue:

Step 8: Change uploads folder organization (very rare)

If the previous steps did not fix your problem (this is rare), then try these two things in order.

Step 8a: in your WordPress admin area, go to “Settings” > “Media” and uncheck the box that says “organize my uploads into month- and year-based folders” and then save. Try uploading images again and see if it works.
Still no joy? Re-check the box and save before trying the next option:

Step 8b: Create a folder on your computer with the current year for a folder name (e.g., “2015”) with 12 additional folders inside it named “01” through “12”. Upload this year-named folder into your “wp-content/uploads” directory on the server via FTP.
After you’ve done this, try uploading images again.

If this did not help, contact your web hosting company and let them know that WordPress is not permitting you to upload files.
If they refuse to help for some reason, you can contact us.



The following support instructions involve the use of an FTP program. If you're not sure what an FTP program is, or how to use it, visit this tutorial before proceeding.


Sometimes, especially with new WordPress installations, there can be problems uploading images into posts and pages.  There are various reasons why this might happen.  This tutorial starts by proposing a number of fixes, from the most common solutions to the most rare. Often you’ll get an error message of some kind but not always.

file type errorserver error msg1
blocked ip address Following the below steps will correct almost all image uploading problems – click the blue “next section” button below to for more options:

Step 1: Test with plugins disabled

The first step in troubleshooting any WordPress error is to deactivate all of your plugins (by going to “Plugins” in your WordPress admin area) to see if that resolves the problem.

deactivate all pluginsIf it does, turn them back on one by one (testing each time) to see which one was the culprit.reactivate pluginsThen, if you can live without that one, do so.  Or you could try using a different plugin that offers similar functionality.

If this did not help, click the blue “next section” button below to continue:

Step 2: Try a different browser

From time to time it happens that a particular browser version has trouble uploading images to WordPress. Safari, in particular has been known for this. So, try uploading images to a post/page using a different browser. It’s a good idea to disable your extensions as well, so as to eliminate that variable.

If this did not help, click the blue “next section” button below to continue:

Step 3: Check your file type

WordPress will only accept .jpg, .gif or .png file types when uploading an image, so check to make sure that the file you’re trying to upload is one of these three file types.  If not, you will most likely get an error message, like so:

Attempting to upload an Adobe Illustrator image file

Attempting to upload an Adobe Illustrator image file

Attempting to upload a TIFF image file

Attempting to upload a TIFF image file

Go back and re-save your image as one of the acceptable file types and try uploading again.

 

If this did not help, click the blue “next section” button below to continue:

Step 4: Test with a default WordPress theme

It’s now time to determine if the problem is specifically related to the ProPhoto theme, or if it is a universal problem affecting all theme types.

With your plugins still disabled, go to “Appearance” > “Themes”. Click “activate” under one of the default WordPress themes like “Twenty Fourteen” or “Twenty Fifteen.”wp42 activate default theme1Don’t worry, you can switch back to ProPhoto with no negative repercussions. If there is not a WordPress theme in the “Available Themes” area you can easily upload one by clicking “Add New” and searching for “Twenty Fifteen” in the search box. See below.

wp42 install default theme1

Search for and install a default WordPress theme

wp42 activate default theme 2

Activate the new theme

With a default theme active, try to upload images to a post/page.

If it works, then it’s time to contact us. That means the problem is, at least in part, related to ProPhoto. To reactivate ProPhoto, click “activate” under the ProPhoto theme.

Reactivate ProPhoto

Reactivate ProPhoto

If this did not help, click the blue “next section” button below to continue:

Step 5: Check your storage space with your host

If this did not help, click the blue “next section” button below to continue:

Step 6: Contact your host

There are a few other things you can try that we covered later in this tutorial. But if you have reached this point and and still are having trouble uploading images to posts and pages, the issue is almost always with your host and the configuration of your server. A server configuration problem can manifest in different ways. You might not be able to upload any images or your problem might be that you can’t upload a certain number of images at once. We have seen servers that allow only 3 images at a time and some that only allow 45 at a time. Other hosts will block your IP address temporarily if you attempt to upload what they deem to be too many images. These are problems you must talk to your host about. You should be able to upload at least 100 images at a time.

The kneejerk response of almost all host tech support folks is to blame the theme or a plugin. However, if you have followed all the steps thus far, you know that is not the case. You might have to press fairly hard to get them to take you seriously. If the first tech support person blows you off, don’t be afraid to call back and try to get in touch with someone more helpful. We do this all the time :). When you can’t do something as basic as upload images to a WordPress site, that is a problem that your host should address immediately. Stress that a full 20% of the internet runs on WordPress right now. Below are some ideas for helping to frame your discussion with your host.

  • State your problem – “I can’t upload images.” or “I can only upload (x) images at one time”
  • Describe any error message you are receiving.
  • Explain that you have replicated the problem running a default WordPress theme with no plugins running.
  • Explain that what you want to do is very common and that if you cannot you’ll have to change hosts. Many other people will as well if they don’t change how they set up their servers.
  • Try to have them replicate the problem on your site while talking to you on the phone.
  • Suggest that there may be a server security setting or module that needs to be less restrictive.
  • Call back and repeat.

Click the blue “next section” button below for some more rare fixes.

Step 7: Check your upload path (rare)

To check your upload path, in your WordPress admin area, go to “Settings” > “Media”.

wp42 settings mediaIf your uploads path is set up correctly so that images are uploaded to “wp-content/uploads“, you won’t see the option to edit the pathway.  You will only see a box to check to organize your uploads into dated folders (which you should check).

wp42 uploads path correctIf you see something different, then that means the uploads path has been set up in a way that could potentially cause uploading problems.wp42 uploads pathProPhoto works best when the default uploads path is maintained.  So if you see this pathway, first record what it is (so you can change back if you need to) and change the first box to “wp-content/uploads.”  Leave the second box blank.  If that fixes your problems, great!  If not, you’ll want to contact your host and ask for their help.  You might want to contact us as well.

What if I want to define a different uploads path?

You can define a different uploads directory via your wp-config.php file as show at http://codex.wordpress.org/Editing_wp-config.php#Moving_uploads_folder.

If this did not help, click the blue “next section” button below to continue:

Step 8: Change uploads folder organization (very rare)

If the previous steps did not fix your problem (this is rare), then try these two things in order.

Step 8a: in your WordPress admin area, go to “Settings” > “Media” and uncheck the box that says “organize my uploads into month- and year-based folders” and then save. Try uploading images again and see if it works.
Still no joy? Re-check the box and save before trying the next option:

Step 8b: Create a folder on your computer with the current year for a folder name (e.g., “2012”) with 12 additional folders inside it named “01” through “12”. Upload this year-named folder into your “wp-content/uploads” directory on the server via FTP.
After you’ve done this, try uploading images again. This process is shown in the video below.

If this did not help, contact your web hosting company and let them know that WordPress is not permitting you to upload files.
If they refuse to help for some reason, you can contact us.

 

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