One-click upgrading problems

WordPress has a really slick feature that allows automatic upgrading of itself with just one click, but unfortunately, it doesn’t work on all web-hosting companies servers. You might happen to be hosted by a company that is not configured correctly for these upgrades to work with one click.

Since WordPress is far and away the most popular website-building tool in the world (the WC3 estimates that 23.5% of the ENTIRE internet is powered by WordPress) it’s really too bad that some web-hosts are still not configured to support automatic upgrading.  Not to get too technical on you, but the server changes needed to support one-click upgrades are also changes that increase website security — so it tends to be true that the webhosts that don’t work are often also poor-quality and not totally secure from hackers.

Would you consider emailing or calling your web-host sales or tech support and bugging them about this? You’d be surprised how much your feedback can matter.  If you do, please tell them that you wish that their servers were configured to support one-click WordPress upgrading.  You might mention that WordPress powers 23.5%% percent of the internet, so it’s not really a niche request, and hint that you might look elsewhere for hosting if they don’t show themselves to be WordPress-friendly. If you want, point them to this article we wrote for webhosts, that explains how to configure their servers correctly.


WordPress has a really slick feature that allows automatic upgrading of itself with just one click, but unfortunately, it doesn’t work on all web-hosting companies servers. You might happen to be hosted by a company that is not configured correctly for these upgrades to work with one click.

Since WordPress is far and away the most popular website-building tool in the world (the WC3 estimates that 23.5% of the ENTIRE internet is powered by WordPress) it’s really too bad that some web-hosts are still not configured to support automatic upgrading.  Not to get too technical on you, but the server changes needed to support one-click upgrades are also changes that increase website security — so it tends to be true that the webhosts that don’t work are often also poor-quality and not totally secure from hackers.

Would you consider emailing or calling your web-host sales or tech support and bugging them about this? You’d be surprised how much your feedback can matter.  If you do, please tell them that you wish that their servers were configured to support one-click WordPress upgrading.  You might mention that WordPress powers 23.5%% percent of the internet, so it’s not really a niche request, and hint that you might look elsewhere for hosting if they don’t show themselves to be WordPress-friendly. If you want, point them to this article we wrote for webhosts, that explains how to configure their servers correctly.

WordPress has a really slick feature that allows automatic upgrading of itself with just one click, but unfortunately, it doesn’t work on all web-hosting companies servers. You might happen to be hosted by a company that is not configured correctly for these upgrades to work with one click.

Since WordPress is far and away the most popular website-building tool in the world (the WC3 estimates that 17.9% of the ENTIRE internet is powered by WordPress) it’s really too bad that some web-hosts are still not configured to support automatic upgrading.  Not to get too technical on you, but the server changes needed to support one-click upgrades are also changes that increase website security — so it tends to be true that the webhosts that don’t work are often also poor-quality and not totally secure from hackers.

Would you consider emailing or calling your web-host sales or tech support and bugging them about this? You’d be surprised how much your feedback can matter.  If you do, please tell them that you wish that their servers were configured to support one-click WordPress upgrading.  You might mention that WordPress powers 17.9% percent of the internet, so it’s not really a niche request, and hint that you might look elsewhere for hosting if they don’t show themselves to be WordPress-friendly. If you want, point them to this article we wrote for webhosts, that explains how to configure their servers correctly.

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