What are WordPress Posts?

Well, you’ve done it! You’ve successfully installed WordPress – the best publishing tool on the Internet. You’re ready to start sharing your thoughts and ideas with the world.

Now what?

Simple. Login to your WordPress system, and in the navigation menu on the left, click on Posts, and then Add New. WordPress displays the Add New Post screen. This area allows you to populate your blog with actual information! You’ll be spending most of your administration time here, so you should spend a bit of time familiarizing yourself with it.

Posts are the principal content of a blog. Posts are the writings, compositions, discussions, discourses, musings, and, yes, the rantings, of a blog owner and other contributors to the blog. Posts are the reason a blog exists; without Posts, there is no blog!

Note: WordPress also provides “Pages” tools when you want to create website content that shouldn’t appear on the blog.

Using Categories

Blog Posts appear in chronological order with the newest Post appearing first, followed by older Posts, and so on. But many blogs consist of Posts that span many categories.  Wouldn’t it be nice if your visitors could view Posts that only belong to a category that interests them?

Each Post can be added to one or more Categories you create. Think of a general category for your posts – get too specific, and you may only use a category for one or two posts, which isn’t very useful.  For example, a category like “Weddings” could contain Posts with your writing and photos for various weddings.  But “September Weddings” makes less sense, because Posts are already organized by date and a category like this wouldn’t be used very often.

As you create posts, you can add them to categories. You can even crate multiple ‘levels’ of categories in a custom hierarchy if your categories are expansive and need nested organization. Apply any categories that apply to a Post and it will show up in each of those category areas on your site – you may add more than one category, for example, if a Post was part of the “Engagements” and the “Outdoor” categories.

Use ProPhoto to link to these category pages in a variety of ways, including your navigation menus or widgets.

Using Tags

Sometimes you want to feature words or phrases that doesn’t appear in a Post you have created, or you may have certain words or phrases that are in the content of your Post, but form a common thread with other Posts. You can think of Tags as micro-categories that can relate many Posts with one another – sort of like the ‘keywords’ of your Post.

By adding Tags to posts, you can relate posts to one another in ways that don’t make much sense as Categories – for example, perhaps you write blog Posts that relate to many specific locations – you might use a Tag to feature “New York City” and “Central Park”.  These might not make sense as Categories for someone who blogs about many different places – there would be too many. But with Tags, you can link your visitors to view all your posts related to “New York City” or “Central Park” without creating a large number of Categories to feature in your navigation menu.

Tags can be used more liberally than Categories because they are not a primary way navigating your site, but simply create a convenient way to interrelate Posts.


Well, you’ve done it! You’ve successfully installed WordPress – the best publishing tool on the Internet. You’re ready to start sharing your thoughts and ideas with the world.

Now what?

Simple. Login to your WordPress system, and in the navigation menu on the left, click on Posts, and then Add New. WordPress displays the Add New Post screen. This area allows you to populate your blog with actual information! You’ll be spending most of your administration time here, so you should spend a bit of time familiarizing yourself with it.

Posts are the principal content of a blog. Posts are the writings, compositions, discussions, discourses, musings, and, yes, the rantings, of a blog owner and other contributors to the blog. Posts are the reason a blog exists; without Posts, there is no blog!

Note: WordPress also provides “Pages” tools when you want to create website content that shouldn’t appear on the blog.

Using Categories

Blog Posts appear in chronological order with the newest Post appearing first, followed by older Posts, and so on. But many blogs consist of Posts that span many categories.  Wouldn’t it be nice if your visitors could view Posts that only belong to a category that interests them?

Each Post can be added to one or more Categories you create. Think of a general category for your posts – get too specific, and you may only use a category for one or two posts, which isn’t very useful.  For example, a category like “Weddings” could contain Posts with your writing and photos for various weddings.  But “September Weddings” makes less sense, because Posts are already organized by date and a category like this wouldn’t be used very often.

As you create posts, you can add them to categories. You can even crate multiple ‘levels’ of categories in a custom hierarchy if your categories are expansive and need nested organization. Apply any categories that apply to a Post and it will show up in each of those category areas on your site – you may add more than one category, for example, if a Post was part of the “Engagements” and the “Outdoor” categories.

Use ProPhoto to link to these category pages in a variety of ways, including your navigation menus or widgets.

Using Tags

Sometimes you want to feature words or phrases that doesn’t appear in a Post you have created, or you may have certain words or phrases that are in the content of your Post, but form a common thread with other Posts. You can think of Tags as micro-categories that can relate many Posts with one another – sort of like the ‘keywords’ of your Post.

By adding Tags to posts, you can relate posts to one another in ways that don’t make much sense as Categories – for example, perhaps you write blog Posts that relate to many specific locations – you might use a Tag to feature “New York City” and “Central Park”.  These might not make sense as Categories for someone who blogs about many different places – there would be too many. But with Tags, you can link your visitors to view all your posts related to “New York City” or “Central Park” without creating a large number of Categories to feature in your navigation menu.

Tags can be used more liberally than Categories because they are not a primary way navigating your site, but simply create a convenient way to interrelate Posts.

Well, you’ve done it! You’ve successfully installed WordPress – the best publishing tool on the Internet. You’re ready to start sharing your thoughts and ideas with the world.

Now what?

Simple. Login to your WordPress system, and in the navigation menu on the left, click on Posts, and then Add New. WordPress displays the Add New Post screen. This area allows you to populate your blog with actual information! You’ll be spending most of your administration time here, so you should spend a bit of time familiarizing yourself with it.

Posts are the principal content of a blog. Posts are the writings, compositions, discussions, discourses, musings, and, yes, the rantings, of a blog owner and other contributors to the blog. Posts are the reason a blog exists; without Posts, there is no blog!

Note: WordPress also provides “Pages” tools when you want to create website content that shouldn’t appear on the blog.

Using Categories

Blog Posts appear in chronological order with the newest Post appearing first, followed by older Posts, and so on. But many blogs consist of Posts that span many categories.  Wouldn’t it be nice if your visitors could view Posts that only belong to a category that interests them?

Each Post can be added to one or more Categories you create. Think of a general category for your posts – get too specific, and you may only use a category for one or two posts, which isn’t very useful.  For example, a category like “Weddings” could contain Posts with your writing and photos for various weddings.  But “September Weddings” makes less sense, because Posts are already organized by date and a category like this wouldn’t be used very often.

As you create posts, you can add them to categories. You can even crate multiple ‘levels’ of categories in a custom hierarchy if your categories are expansive and need nested organization. Apply any categories that apply to a Post and it will show up in each of those category areas on your site – you may add more than one category, for example, if a Post was part of the “Engagements” and the “Outdoor” categories.

Use ProPhoto to link to these category pages in a variety of ways, including your navigation menus or widgets.

Using Tags

Sometimes you want to feature words or phrases that doesn’t appear in a Post you have created, or you may have certain words or phrases that are in the content of your Post, but form a common thread with other Posts. You can think of Tags as micro-categories that can relate many Posts with one another – sort of like the ‘keywords’ of your Post.

By adding Tags to posts, you can relate posts to one another in ways that don’t make much sense as Categories – for example, perhaps you write blog Posts that relate to many specific locations – you might use a Tag to feature “New York City” and “Central Park”.  These might not make sense as Categories for someone who blogs about many different places – there would be too many. But with Tags, you can link your visitors to view all your posts related to “New York City” or “Central Park” without creating a large number of Categories to feature in your navigation menu.

Tags can be used more liberally than Categories because they are not a primary way navigating your site, but simply create a convenient way to interrelate Posts.

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