WordPress Manual Upgrade


This tutorial will show you how to do a manual upgrade of WordPress.
A manual upgrade is necessary if you are upgrading from a version before 2.7, or if the automatic upgrader doesn’t work for you.
If you’d rather just have someone else do the upgrade for you, see here.

Be aware that the latest WordPress (3.2 and above) requires that your server computer meets minimum requirements for PHP and MySQL software – if you see an error about insufficient PHP or MySQL software versions, you will need to contact your web hosting company for tech support.

Step 1: Backup your Blog

The first step in upgrading your blog is to make a complete backup first (see here). It is also without a doubt the most important step. If you have a good backup, then you’re safe even if you totally mess things up. Do not skip this step, really. Backing up your blog means making a copy of your blog files AND backing up your database. Follow the steps in the next sections to perform a complete backup of your blog files and database.

Step 2: Deactivate your Plugins

After you’ve backed up your blog, you’re next going to deactivate any active plugins you’re using.

To do this, just go to “Plugins” => “Installed” in your WP Admin area.

plugins-installed

Then, click on the “active” link near the top of the page to view just your active plugins.

active-plugins

Next, set the ‘bulk actions’ dropdown to “deactivate” and click apply.

deactivate-plugins-apply

This will deactivate all of your currently running plugins, making your upgrade process easier.

Step 3: Delete old core WordPress files

This next section may seem scary or confusing, but if you read it through carefully and then watch the video, it’s actually pretty easy. And, since you backed up, you can always recover if you make a mistake. So relax!

The following support instructions involve the use of an FTP program. If you're not sure what an FTP program is, or how to use it, visit this tutorial before proceeding.

The next step is to use an FTP program to delete most of your old WordPress core files. (A core file is everything WordPress uses to run itelf, except theme, plugin, and uploaded files.)

Using your FTP program, navigate to the folder where WordPress is installed and select the correct files to delete. This is almost always all of the files in your blog’s installation folder EXCEPT for one special file and one whole folder. The file is called “wp-config.php” and the folder is called “wp-content“. DO NOT DELETE THOSE TWO THINGS. The former contains custom connection information from your blog files to your database, and the latter holds all your uploaded images.

Also, don’t delete any other folders or files that you have put into the WordPress installation folder that are not WordPress files or folders.

So, to review:

DO delete only two folders — “wp-admin” and “wp-includes”. DO NOT delete any other folders, especially “wp-content”.

DO delete all individual files that start with “wp-” EXCEPT “wp-config.php”. Also delete index.php, readme.html, license.txt, and xmlrpc.php.

Step 4: Get the newest version of WordPress

The next step is to get the new WordPress core files to replace the ones you just deleted. To do that, go to this page, the WordPress download page, and download the newest version of WordPress.

After you download, you’ll have a zipped file called “wordpress.zip“. Unzip that file (it might already be unzipped if you use Safari on a Mac) and you’ll have a folder called “wordpress“.

unzip-wordpress

Step 5: Dummy-proof yourself

Once you’ve got your new zipped file with the latest version of WordPress, unzip it and dig around inside it until you find the “wp-content” folder. Since we left our copy of this on the server in step 3, we want to delete this folder so that we don’t upload and accidentally overwrite our themes, plugins, and uploaded pictures. Delete that folder.

dummy-proof-delete-wp-content

Step 6: Upload the new core files

Next, we’re going to use our FTP program to upload the new version to our server. To do this, grab all the file and folders INSIDE the unzipped WordPress folder (which now should be missing the “wp-content” folder) and upload them into the main directory where your blog lives on your server.

DO NOT upload the whole folder you downloaded from WordPress, called “wordpress” as a unit. You want to upload the files inside of that folder into the same directory where you just deleted your core files. Uploading can take a as much as 10-15 minutes, so be patient. There are lots of little files to upload.

Step 7: Upgrade your database

Most, but not all, WordPress upgrades also do a little tweaking of your database. To upgrade your database, all you have to do is try to login to your blog’s admin area. after completing steps 1-6. If a database upgrade is required, you will be prompted to click a link saying “Upgrade WordPress Database”. Go ahead and click to let it upgrade, safe in the confidence that even if something went terribly wrong, you have already backed up your database.

database-upgrade-required

When it finishes, you’re all set, except for one last step:

Step 8: Reactivate Plugins

This is basically just step 2 in reverse. Just go to “Plugins” => “Installed”, and reactivate the ones you were using. You may need to re-set some of the settings in your plugins, it is possible your settings were lost during upgrade. Note: a lot of the plugins you had been using may not be necessary with ProPhoto; namely “Ajaxd-Wordpress”, “FlashFader”, “Google Analytics”, “Feedburner Feedsmith” have all been incorporated into the theme, so there is no need to reactivate any of those if you were using them previously.

If you use a caching plugin, be sure to clear the cache so your visitors load a fresh version.

Step 9: Celebrate

You’ve done it! You’ve backed up your blog and successfully upgraded our WordPress installation manually. From now on, you should be able to upgrade with one-click from your WordPress admin area by going to “Tools” => “Upgrade”.


This tutorial will show you how to do a manual upgrade of WordPress.
A manual upgrade is necessary if you are upgrading from a version before 2.7, or if the automatic upgrader doesn’t work for you.
If you’d rather just have someone else do the upgrade for you, see here.

Be aware that the latest WordPress (3.2 and above) requires that your server computer meets minimum requirements for PHP and MySQL software – if you see an error about insufficient PHP or MySQL software versions, you will need to contact your web hosting company for tech support.

Step 1: Backup your Blog

The first step in upgrading your blog is to make a complete backup first (see here). It is also without a doubt the most important step. If you have a good backup, then you’re safe even if you totally mess things up. Do not skip this step, really. Backing up your blog means making a copy of your blog files AND backing up your database. Follow the steps in the next sections to perform a complete backup of your blog files and database.

Step 2: Deactivate your Plugins

After you’ve backed up your blog, you’re next going to deactivate any active plugins you’re using.

To do this, just go to “Plugins” => “Installed” in your WP Admin area.

plugins-installed

Then, click on the “active” link near the top of the page to view just your active plugins.

active-plugins

Next, set the ‘bulk actions’ dropdown to “deactivate” and click apply.

deactivate-plugins-apply

This will deactivate all of your currently running plugins, making your upgrade process easier.

Step 3: Delete old core WordPress files

This next section may seem scary or confusing, but if you read it through carefully and then watch the video, it’s actually pretty easy. And, since you backed up, you can always recover if you make a mistake. So relax!

The following support instructions involve the use of an FTP program. If you're not sure what an FTP program is, or how to use it, visit this tutorial before proceeding.

The next step is to use an FTP program to delete most of your old WordPress core files. (A core file is everything WordPress uses to run itelf, except theme, plugin, and uploaded files.)

Using your FTP program, navigate to the folder where WordPress is installed and select the correct files to delete. This is almost always all of the files in your blog’s installation folder EXCEPT for one special file and one whole folder. The file is called “wp-config.php” and the folder is called “wp-content“. DO NOT DELETE THOSE TWO THINGS. The former contains custom connection information from your blog files to your database, and the latter holds all your uploaded images.

Also, don’t delete any other folders or files that you have put into the WordPress installation folder that are not WordPress files or folders.

So, to review:

DO delete only two folders — “wp-admin” and “wp-includes”. DO NOT delete any other folders, especially “wp-content”.

DO delete all individual files that start with “wp-” EXCEPT “wp-config.php”. Also delete index.php, readme.html, license.txt, and xmlrpc.php.

Step 4: Get the newest version of WordPress

The next step is to get the new WordPress core files to replace the ones you just deleted. To do that, go to this page, the WordPress download page, and download the newest version of WordPress.

After you download, you’ll have a zipped file called “wordpress.zip“. Unzip that file (it might already be unzipped if you use Safari on a Mac) and you’ll have a folder called “wordpress“.

unzip-wordpress

Step 5: Dummy-proof yourself

Once you’ve got your new zipped file with the latest version of WordPress, unzip it and dig around inside it until you find the “wp-content” folder. Since we left our copy of this on the server in step 3, we want to delete this folder so that we don’t upload and accidentally overwrite our themes, plugins, and uploaded pictures. Delete that folder.

dummy-proof-delete-wp-content

Step 6: Upload the new core files

Next, we’re going to use our FTP program to upload the new version to our server. To do this, grab all the file and folders INSIDE the unzipped WordPress folder (which now should be missing the “wp-content” folder) and upload them into the main directory where your blog lives on your server.

DO NOT upload the whole folder you downloaded from WordPress, called “wordpress” as a unit. You want to upload the files inside of that folder into the same directory where you just deleted your core files. Uploading can take a as much as 10-15 minutes, so be patient. There are lots of little files to upload.

Step 7: Upgrade your database

Most, but not all, WordPress upgrades also do a little tweaking of your database. To upgrade your database, all you have to do is try to login to your blog’s admin area. after completing steps 1-6. If a database upgrade is required, you will be prompted to click a link saying “Upgrade WordPress Database”. Go ahead and click to let it upgrade, safe in the confidence that even if something went terribly wrong, you have already backed up your database.

database-upgrade-required

When it finishes, you’re all set, except for one last step:

Step 8: Reactivate Plugins

This is basically just step 2 in reverse. Just go to “Plugins” => “Installed”, and reactivate the ones you were using. You may need to re-set some of the settings in your plugins, it is possible your settings were lost during upgrade. Note: a lot of the plugins you had been using may not be necessary with ProPhoto; namely “Ajaxd-Wordpress”, “FlashFader”, “Google Analytics”, “Feedburner Feedsmith” have all been incorporated into the theme, so there is no need to reactivate any of those if you were using them previously.

If you use a caching plugin, be sure to clear the cache so your visitors load a fresh version.

Step 9: Celebrate

You’ve done it! You’ve backed up your blog and successfully upgraded our WordPress installation manually. From now on, you should be able to upgrade with one-click from your WordPress admin area by going to “Tools” => “Upgrade”.

This tutorial will show you how to do a manual upgrade of WordPress.
A manual upgrade is necessary if you are upgrading from a version before 2.7, or if the automatic upgrader doesn’t work for you.
Or, if you’d rather just have someone else do the upgrade for you, see here.

Be aware that the latest WordPress (3.2 and above) requires that your server computer meets minimum requirements for PHP and MySQL software – if you see an error about insufficient PHP or MySQL software versions, you will need to contact your web hosting company for tech support.

Step 1: Backup your Blog

The first step in upgrading your blog is to make a complete backup first (see here). It is also without a doubt the most important step. If you have a good backup, then you’re safe even if you totally mess things up. Do not skip this step, really. Backing up your blog means making a copy of your blog files AND backing up your database. Follow the steps in the next sections to perform a complete backup of your blog files and database.

Step 2: Deactivate your Plugins

After you’ve backed up your blog, you’re next going to deactivate any active plugins you’re using.

To do this, just go to “Plugins” => “Installed” in your WP Admin area.

plugins-installed

Then, click on the “active” link near the top of the page to view just your active plugins.

active-plugins

Next, set the ‘bulk actions’ dropdown to “deactivate” and and click apply

deactivate-plugins-apply

This will deactivate all of your currently running plugins, making your upgrade process easier.

Step 3: Delete old core WordPress files

This next section may seem scary or confusing, but if you read it through carefully and then watch the video, it’s actually pretty easy. And, since you backed up, you can always recover if you make a mistake. So relax!

The following support instructions involve the use of an FTP program. If you're not sure what an FTP program is, or how to use it, visit this tutorial before proceeding.

The next step is to use an FTP program to delete most of your old WordPress core files. (A core file is everything WordPress uses to run itelf, except theme, plugin, and uploaded files.)

Using your FTP program, navigate to the folder where WordPress is installed and select the correct files to delete. This is almost always all of the files in your blog’s installation folder EXCEPT for one special file and one whole folder. The file is called “wp-config.php” and the folder is called “wp-content“. DO NOT DELETE THOSE TWO THINGS. The former contains custom connection information from your blog files to your database, and the latter holds all your uploaded images.

Also, don’t delete any other folders or files that you have put into the WordPress installation folder that are not WordPress files or folders.

So, to review:

DO delete only two folders — “wp-admin” and “wp-includes”. DO NOT delete any other folders, especially “wp-content”.

DO delete all individual files that start with “wp-” EXCEPT “wp-config.php”. Also delete index.php, readme.html, license.txt, and xmlrpc.php.

Step 4: Get the newest version of WordPress

The next step is to get the new WordPress core files to replace the ones you just deleted. To do that, go to this page, the WordPress download page, and download the newest version of WordPress.

After you download, you’ll have a zipped file called “wordpress.zip“. Unzip that file (it might already be unzipped if you use Safari on a Mac) and you’ll have a folder called “wordpress“.

unzip-wordpress

Step 5: Dummy-proof yourself

Once you’ve got your new zipped file with the latest version of WordPress, unzip it and dig around inside it until you find the “wp-content” folder. Since we left our copy of this on the server in step 3, we want to delete this folder so that we don’t upload and accidentally overwrite our themes, plugins, and uploaded pictures. Delete that folder.

dummy-proof-delete-wp-content

Step 6: Upload the new core files

Next, we’re going to use our FTP program to upload the new version to our server. To do this, grab all the file and folders INSIDE the unzipped WordPress folder (which now should be missing the “wp-content” folder) and upload them into the main directory where your blog lives on your server.

DO NOT upload the whole folder you downloaded from WordPress, called “wordpress” as a unit. You want to upload the files inside of that folder into the same directory where you just deleted your core files. Uploading can take a as much as 10-15 minutes, so be patient. There are lots of little files to upload.

Step 7: Upgrade your database

Most, but not all, WordPress upgrades also do a little tweaking of your database. To upgrade your database, all you have to do is try to login to your blog’s admin area. after completing steps 1-6. If a database upgrade is required, you will be prompted to click a link saying “Upgrade WordPress Database”. Go ahead and click to let it upgrade, safe in the confidence that even if something went terribly wrong, you have already backed up your database.

database-upgrade-required

When it finishes, you’re all set, except for one last step.

Step 8: Reactivate Plugins

This is basically just step 2 in reverse. Just go to “Plugins” => “Installed”, and reactivate the ones you were using. You may need to re-set some of the settings in your plugins, it is possible your settings were lost during upgrade. Note: a lot of the plugins you had been using may not be necessary with ProPhoto; namely “Ajaxd-Wordpress”, “FlashFader”, “Google Analytics”, “Feedburner Feedsmith” have all been incorporated into the theme, so there is no need to reactivate.

If you use a caching plugin, be sure to clear the cache so your visitors load a fresh version.

Step 9: Celebrate

You’ve done it! You’ve backed up your blog and successfully upgraded our WordPress installation manually. From now on, you should be able to upgrade with one-click from your WordPress admin area by going to “Tools” => “Upgrade”.

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